Senior Fellows

Senior Fellows

Senior Fellows for the Study of Liberalism and a Free Society are faculty with ongoing scholarly work that advances the principles of the good society. Senior Fellows convene regularly to discuss challenges to the liberal ideal within and beyond the academy.

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Christina Bambrick is assistant professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame. Her work focuses on constitutional theory and development. She is currently writing a book manuscript on the horizontal application of rights to non-state actors in a comparative context, looking at shifting understandings of public and private in comparative constitutionalism in the United States, India, Germany, South Africa, and the European Union. 

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Nicholas Buccola is professor of political science and the Elizabeth and Morris Glicksman Chair in Political Science at Linfield University. His work focuses on American political thought, especially regarding rights and justice. Buccola is the author of “The Fire Is Upon Us: James Baldwin, William F. Buckley Jr., and the Debate over Race in America,” for which he received an Oregon Book Award. His writings have appeared in numerous scholarly journals as well as the New York Times, Salon, and Dissent. He is currently at work on a book that examines competing conceptions of freedom in the American civil rights and conservative movements.

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Bradley Campbell is professor of sociology at California State University, Los Angeles. His work focuses on moral conflict — clashes of right and wrong — and his recent work has examined conflicts over free speech on college campuses. He is the author of “The Geometry of Genocide: A Study in Pure Sociology” and coauthor of “The Rise of Victimhood Culture: Microaggressions, Safe Spaces, and the New Culture Wars.” His writing has appeared in the New York Times, Time, and The Chronicle of Higher Education.

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Samuel Goldman is associate professor of political science at George Washington University, where he is executive director of the John L. Loeb, Jr. Institute for Religious Freedom, and director of the Politics & Values Program. His work focuses on political theory, religion and politics, and conservative political thought. His most recent book, “After Nationalism: Being American in an Age of Division,” was published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2021. In addition to his academic research, Goldman is a national correspondent at The Week. His writing has also appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and many other publications.

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Joshua C. Hall is professor of economics and the Milan Puskar Dean of the John Chambers College of Business and Economics at West Virginia University. His work focuses on global economic freedom, including trade and property rights. He was the 2019-2020 Benedum Distinguished Scholar in Behavioral and Social Sciences at WVU, the university’s highest research award. Hall is co-author of the widely-cited annual report, “Economic Freedom of the World.” 

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Hrishikesh Joshi is assistant professor of philosophy at Bowling Green State University. His research interests include political epistemology, public discourse, liberalism, and various issues at the intersection of philosophy, politics, and economics (PPE). He is the author of “Why It’s OK to Speak Your Mind.” 

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Amna Khalid is associate professor of history at Carleton College. Her work focuses on modern South Asian history and the history of medicine. She also writes and speaks frequently on free expression, academic freedom, and campus politics. Combining her interest in free expression with her expertise in history, she hosts a podcast called “Banished,” which explores what happens when people, ideas and works of art come into conflict with our modern sensibilities. Khalid’s writing has appeared in many outlets including The Chronicle of Higher Education, Inside Higher Ed, and The New Republic. 

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Jonathan Marks is professor and chair of politics and international relations at Ursinus College. His work focuses on modern and contemporary political philosophy. He also writes frequently about free speech and higher education. He is the author of “Let’s Be Reasonable: A Conservative Case for Liberal Education” and “Perfection and Disharmony in the Thought of Jean Jacques Rousseau.” Marks’ writing has appeared in many outlets including Inside Higher Ed, The Chronicle of Higher Education, The Weekly Standard, and The Wall Street Journal. He is also a regular contributor to the Commentary Magazine blog.

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Timothy Wyman McCarty is associate professor of political science and international relations at the University of San Diego. His work focuses on democratic theorytheories of complicity & moral responsibilitypolitics & literature, and right-wing politics in America. He is co-editor with Sabine von Mering of “Right-Wing Radicalism Today: Perspectives from Europe and the US.” McCarty is currently at work on a book-length project on the politics of complicity, provisionally titled The Tragedy of Complicity.

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Pamela Paresky is visiting senior research associate at the Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge at the University of Chicago, senior scholar at the Network Contagion Research Institute, and a frequent contributor to PsychologyToday.com. Her current project, Habits of a Free Mind, is a toolkit for engaging across lines of difference. Paresky previously served as senior scholar in psychology and human development at the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education and was lead researcher on Jonathan Haidt and Greg Lukianoff’s New York Times bestselling book, “The Coddling of the American Mind.” Her writing has appeared in many outlets including The New York Times, Politico, and The Guardian.

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Chris Surprenant is professor of ethics, strategy, and public policy, director of the University Honors Program, and founding director of the Urban Entrepreneurship and Policy Institute at the University of New Orleans. His work focuses on current issues in ethics and public policy, including the connection between entrepreneurship and human well-being; the importance of free exchange to the proper functioning of a free society; and the role of financial incentives in shaping institutions and influencing public policy.

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Click here to view a list of past Senior Fellows.